Balloon Sinuplasty is Helping Countless Sinusitis Sufferers Breath Again

Virtually everyone knows the stuffed-up feeling of blocked sinuses. It’s part of the common cold and other respiratory infections. But when your symptoms endure for more than three months, you’re into the realm of chronic sinusitis, and your stuffiness is no longer a temporary inconvenience.

When your sinusitis requires corrective treatment, you’re not limited to conventional surgery anymore. You can now turn to a new, minimally invasive surgical procedure that clears your breathing without cutting away bone and other tissue, providing you with fast relief. At Southern ENT, we offer in-office balloon sinuplasty. Read on to learn more about this procedure and what you can expect.

Balloon sinuplasty

Medically called balloon catheter dilation surgery, the balloon sinuplasty procedure uses no incisions to clear blocked and infected sinuses. With sinus passages open and draining properly, the symptoms of your sinusitis vanish, and unlike conventional surgery, you’re back to your regular activities in a day or two.

The balloon sinuplasty procedure received approval from the Food and Drug Administration in 2005, and since then it’s been helping many sinusitis sufferers breathe easy, with a very high success rate and long-lasting results.

How balloon sinuplasty works

The ear, nose, and throat specialists at Southern ENT perform balloon sinuplasty in office, so there’s no hospital stay. Often, we can perform the procedure under a local anesthetic, so you can drive yourself home after the procedure. We discuss the anesthesia protocol for your procedure with you prior to your appointment.

During the procedure, we place a slim and flexible catheter into your sinus through your nose. Built-up mucus and pus is flushed from your sinus, immediately reducing the pressure you’ve been feeling. A small balloon at the end of the catheter is inflated, applying gentle pressure to the sinus walls, pushing back swollen tissue and restructuring the bones surrounding your sinus.

At the end of the procedure, we deflate the balloon and remove it. Your sinus passage is widened, and the accumulated mucus and pus is gone. Any remaining infection typically clears quickly, since your sinus can now drain normally, and you can breathe without obstruction.

Balloon sinuplasty recovery

Most people can return to their daily routines within a day or two. In the first 24 hours after the procedure, you should not to blow your nose, and for about a week, you should avoid strenuous activity that results in an elevated heart rate. Sleeping with your head elevated also aids post-procedure drainage.

It’s normal to experience swelling and congestion for about a week after your sinuplasty, and you can also expect some bloody discharge. It’s unlikely that you will experience excessive pain, and your ENT specialist will advise you what medications to take during your recovery.

 

Well over 90% of patients receiving balloon sinuplasty report improvement in their sinusitis symptoms. You can add yourself to the roster of success by contacting us at Southern ENT at any of our seven southeast Louisiana locations. Telephone us today or use our online form to arrange a consultation.

 

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